10 Black Women who are Social Entrepreneurs you Should Know

Social entrepreneurs are unique in that they see a problem in society, and use entrepreneurial means to create a business that will help bring social change.

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Social entrepreneurs take many forms. Some founders want to give a portion of their proceeds to their favorite charity or a certain cause, while the main focus of others' ventures is to create change for those in need. 

Here are 10 Black women who are using social entrepreneurship to bring real change: 

Ann Higdon - Improved Solutions for Urban Systems

Image: YouTube 

Image: YouTube 

Ann Higdon wanted to help young people who had troubled pasts and struggled in academia. So in 1992 she founded. Soon after in 1999, she was opening up her first dropout recovery career and technical school. Higdon was later given the Manhattan Institute’s Richard Cornuelle Award for Social Entrepreneurship. 

Brenda Palms Barber - Sweet Beginnings

Image: Pinterest

Image: Pinterest

Brenda Palms Barber wanted to break the cycle of ex-cons going back to jail, due to failure to get back into society. She started Sweet Beginnings She hired ex-felons to help make her skin-care products and became an employer of choice for them. Her recidivism rate is less than 4% while the national average for those who have been to prison is 65%. 

RELATED: 5 Reasons Why Giving Back Is Good For Your Health

Angie Beatty - J.U.I.C.E Project

Image: Echoing Green 

Image: Echoing Green 

Angie Beatty and her partner saw during an Echoing Green Fellowship, that there were serious issues in the community with diabetes, stroke and heart disease.  They provide free workshops on health literacy and Michelle Obama gave the J.U.I.C.E. Project a special shoutout in a speech on the Social Innovation Fund.

Angela Coleman - Sisterhood Agenda

Image: Sisterhood  Agenda 

Image: Sisterhood  Agenda 

Angela Coleman launched Sisterhood Agenda to help impoverished women of color learn critical thinking skills and educate future leaders. 

Deborah Ahenkorah - Golden Baobab

Image: Linkedin 

Image: Linkedin 

Deborah Ahenkorah launched social venture Golden Baobab to help African children get their hands of African literature, and each year the organization awards the Golden Baobab Prize. She calls for unpublished work each year and matches authors with publishers globally. 

Ameca Reali and Adrienne Wheeler - Justice and Accountability Center of Louisiana

Image: Propeller 

Image: Propeller 

These two women are doing what they can to change the justice system in Louisiana due to the fact that the state has the highest incarceration rate in the nation. They help to provide files and legal support to those in the system and work with the community to change in the Louisiana justice system. 

Amina Yamusa -  Our Bloc

Image: Echoing Green 

Image: Echoing Green 

Amina Yamusa is CEO and co-founder of Our Bloc, which is an organization for Black college students. She uses multicultural talent and resources to lead group of students and recent graduates. 

Jessica Johnson - Scholarship Academy

Image: The Scholarship Academy 

Image: The Scholarship Academy 

Jessica Johnson founded the Scholarship Academy which trains Black men to promote the power of scholarships using themselves as case studies. She herself has won more than $200,000 in scholarship money. 

Jessica Matthews - Uncharted Play

Image: YouTube 

Image: YouTube 

At a very young age Jessica Matthews was invented new products to create a better life for others. At age 22 Jessica Matthews founded her company Uncharted Play, a renewable energy company specializing in motion-based, miniaturized power systems. She;s also the inventor of the SOCCKET Ball which provides power for developing countries. 

Risë Wilson – Founder of Laundromat Project

Image: They've Got Next 

Image: They've Got Next 

Risë Wilson originally founded the Laundromat Project in the early 1990's so that people could create art, and not just consume it. She works to build a system in which she can support programs at the intersection of art and political issues. 

 

Who are some social entrepreneurs you know who are doing amazing things?